Paycheck Calculator Kansas - KS

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Kansas - KS Paycheck Calculator: Hourly and Salary

Are you planning to move to Kansas State to start your new life with a new job or business? Or you have already moved in here and trying to figure out what you are going to pay to your employees or earn as an employee in Kansas? Don't Worry! You are at the right place!

This guide is enough to make up your mind to move to this state and start your new life. Moreover, it also has a step by step details to help you calculate the "Take-Home Pay" of an employee, to make it easy for you to deduce your employment cost or your net earnings as an employee.

So, let's get started with some of the important details about the state that you must know before moving to this State.

Moving to Kansas:

Kansas, a state geographically located in the heart of the United States. It is known by several names like "Sunflower state" and "Wheat state" due to the abundance of wild sunflowers and wheat production.

"Topeka" is the capital city of the state, has a bright forecast for economic growth and a cost of living that is fairly below the national level. Besides these, the best thing about moving to Topeka, Kansas is that you could earn up to $15000 just by moving to this city under a pilot program called "Choose Topeka". This program aims to support new residents to move into the city and start their new job with ease.

Along with Topeka, all of the other counties and cities in Kansas, offer a favorable environment to start.

Housing in Kansas is ranked at number seven in the United States for affordability with $169,900 as of the median price of a home and $1,080 being the median rent price in the state. Along with Housing affordability, this state is even affordable in terms of general living including transportation, food, healthcare, and other utilities. It has the cost of living index of 90 points, which is 10 points lower than the national index of 100. Therefore, living here won't add extra burden to your pocket.

After housing, the next thing you need is a good job or a profitable business to earn your livings. Although Kansas is famous for farming, corn, and sunflowers, there are a lot more business and job opportunities in leading industries here, including health and Medicare, manufacturing, transportation, and trade. According to the studies and reports Kansas is ranked 15th among the best states for jobs and has an unemployment rate of 3.4%, which well lower than the national average of 4.1% in 2019.

This Midwest state is also known for quality education provided by the numerous top-ranking schools, universities, and colleges including Nickerson Elementary School, Marmaton Valley High School, Kansas State University and Wichita State University.

The atmosphere of Kansas has a continental climate with quite summers, mild winters, and humidity on the moderate side. However, Kansas also ranks second nationally for the number of tornados, whereas some parts even have extreme weather like hot summer and snowy winter. Therefore, the weather in this state can be unfavorable for some and exciting for the rest.

You indeed need a good job, a beautiful house and an amazing family to lead a peaceful life but I think life is incomplete without outing. Kansas State offers several must-see places to well spend your weekends and vacation including museums rich of Native American history, historical areas like Boot Hill and Fort Larned, fascinating interactive centers like Flint Hills Discovery Center in Manhattan, stunning natural formations at Monument Rocks, Keeper of the Plains Plaza, statue in Wichita and much more.

After reading all of the earlier mentioned perks, you must have made up your mind to move here. But as we know that the main thing to live anywhere happily is money, for which you must have a job with maximum earning or business with abundant profit.

So if you want to know about your take-home pay of the job you are about to join in Kansas, or compare several jobs or calculate the employment cost for business, you need to go through several calculations, state laws and facts to figure out the exact paycheck amount. These calculations can be hectic and tricky, for which our experts have created an Amazing Kansas Paycheck Calculator along with a following comprehensive guide to give you instant results with accuracy, consequently saving much of your time and effort.

How to Calculate Paycheck in Kansas?

To calculate the Paycheck in Kansas, you must follow the steps ahead, but before that, you must read some of these Kansas State, State Payroll Tax and Federal Payroll facts, that would be useful for you:

Kansas Tax Facts:

  • Along with federal income tax charged on rates ranging from 0% to 37%, the Kansas Residents are entitled to pay state income tax. Kansas Income tax is divided into 3 tax brackets ranging from 2.9% to 5.2%, depending on the income level and filing status.
  • Supplemental Wages and Bonuses are charged at a flat rate of 5% for State income tax.
  • No city or county in Kansas charges any local income tax. However, income from other sources like dividends and interest may be charged with local income tax, depending on which city you live in.
  • The Median Household income of Kansas residents is $55,477, according to the report published by the United States Census Bureau.
  • The Kansas Minimum wage is the same as the federal minimum wage rate of $7.25 for almost all employees. However, some employees are exempted from this law. The exemption is discussed in detail ahead.
  • The Cash Minimum wage rate for Tipped Employees is $2.13, with the maximum tip credit of $5.12.
  • The sunflower state doesn't require any State Disability Insurance (SDI) tax from the employees or employers. However, employers are entitled to pay State Unemployment Insurance (SUI) Tax at the rate ranging from 0.20% to 7.60%, on the first $14,000 earned by each employee. Though, new employers are given relief as they only have to pay on a flat rate of 2.7%.
  • There is NO reciprocal Agreement of Kansas with any other state. Therefore, non-resident employees working in Kansas, have to pay State Income Tax.
  • The Livable Wage for Kansas Resident (as in 2019) for Single Adult is $10.96 and for a Couple (1 working) with 2 children is $24.47.

As we are done here with Facts, now let's get started with steps that you need to follow for calculation the Take-Home Pay of an employee:

Step 1 - Calculating Gross Pay:

  1. To calculate Gross Pay, first, you need to determine the Pay Type of an employee. It is whether an employee is paid on an hourly basis or salary basis.

Hourly Employees:

Hourly Base Employees are paid for each hour they work in a day or a week, at the mutually agreed hourly rate. However, the mutually agreed hourly rate must be as per the Federal and State Minimum Wage law.

Hourly Employees are also entitled to receive overtime, for each excess hours worked after Regular worked hours in a day or week. The overtime rate in most of the states is one and a half times the regular hourly rate.


Salaried Employees:

Salaried employees receive a fixed but mutually agreed on pay, for a decided pay frequency, usually semi-monthly or monthly. However, for gross payment determination for a pay period, the annual salary is divided by the pay frequency.

Most of the salaried employees are exempted from Overtime law. Therefore, they are not entitled to receive overtime, regardless of how many excess hours they work. However, some exceptional salaried employees may be eligible to receive overtime according to federal or state law.


  1. Remember, Supplementary Wages like bonuses, commissions, and paid leaves, as well as double time and fringe benefits, are also taxable wages. Therefore they must also be included in gross pay before federal and state tax calculation.

Step 2 – Subtracting Pre-Tax Deductions (If Any):

Pre-Tax Deduction is an amount deducted from employee's gross pay before any withholding tax is deducted. These deductions have several advantages, including the reduction of taxable wages. Hence, increasing the take-home pay of an employee. However, not all deductions can be considered as free from all taxes, which means some of the deductions may require certain taxes to be withheld.

Some of the standard Pre-tax deductions are:

  • Health Savings Accounts or FSA or HSA plans
  • Commuter Benefits
  • Healthcare Insurance
  • Short-Term Disability
  • Dental Insurance
  • Medical Expenses and Flexible Spending Accounts
  • Vision Benefits
  • Retirement funds like a traditional 401(k)

Note: Pre-Tax deduction rate changes from year to year, according to inflation and costs of living by the federal government. Therefore, you must keep yourself updated with all rates before making any deductions.


Step 3 – Calculate and Subtract Federal Taxes:

Federal Taxes are taxes deducted from almost every employee, regardless of which state or county they work in.

Federal Taxes are calculated according to the details provided by the employee on Form W-4, which comprises of income, filing status, number of dependents, number of allowances, number of jobs, etc.

The details are form W-4, are assessed and used by the employer to deduce the federal tax bracket, in which the employee's taxable wage lay upon.

Federal Taxes ranges from 0% to 37% have seven tax brackets, depending on filing status, income, and the number of allowances claimed. Below is the income tax details for the year 2019-2020:

Single Filers
Taxable Income Rate
$0 - $9,700 10%
$9,700 - $39,475 12%
$39,475 - $84,200 22%
$84,200 - $160,725 24%
$160,725 - $204,100 32%
$204,100 - $510,300 35%
$510,300+ 37%

Married, Filing Jointly
Taxable Income Rate
$0 - $19,400 10%
$19,400 - $78,950 12%
$78,950 - $168,400 22%
$168,400 - $321,450 24%
$321,450 - $408,200 32%
$408,200 - $612,350 35%
$612,350+ 37%

Married, Filing Separately
Taxable Income Rate
$0 - $9,700 10%
$9,700 - $39,475 12%
$39,475 - $84,200 22%
$84,200 - $160,725 24%
$160,725 - $204,100 32%
$204,100 - $306,175 35%
$306,175+ 37%

Head of Household
Taxable Income Rate
$0 - $13,850 10%
$13,850 - $52,850 12%
$52,850 - $84,200 22%
$84,200 - $160,700 24%
$160,700 - $204,100 32%
$204,100 - $510,300 35%
$510,300+ 37%

Step 4 – Deduct FICA Taxes:

Along with Federal Withholding, employers are also required to withhold Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) taxes from the employee's paycheck as well as pay a matching amount themselves to the IRS.

There are two types of FICA taxes:

  1. Social Security:

Employers are entitled to withhold 6.2% from the first $132,900 (wage base limit for 2019), taxable wages earned by the employee. Moreover, the employer is also required to pay an equal amount to the IRS for each employee.


  1. Medicare:

Medicare tax is another type of FICA Tax that an employer must withhold from the taxable gross wage of the employee, at the rate of 1.45%. Unlike social security, there is no wage base limit. However, if the employee earns more than the defined threshold than he/she is subjected to an additional 0.9% of the Additional Medicare Tax rate, for every dollar earned above the threshold amount.

Like Social Security, IRS also requires the employer to pay an equal amount of Medicare tax for each employee.


Step 5 – Payment of FUTA Taxes

The Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA) is a tax that the IRS requires the employer to pay without deducting anything from the employee's paycheck.

The FUTA Tax rate for 2019 is 6.0% of the first taxable wage up to $7000 of an employee. However, once the taxable wage limit is crossed for a particular employee, then the employer no longer has to pay this tax.

What to reduce FUTA Tax?

Yes! Then you must pay State Unemployment Insurance (SUI) tax in full and on time and get a FUTA tax credit of up to 5.4%. Which means, you saved a whopping 90% from FUTA Tax.


Step 6 – Subtract Post-Tax Deductions (If any):

Although, employers are not required to withhold any amount as a post-tax deduction, unless if an employee voluntarily asks to do so. However, there are some deductions ordered by the court like child support or wage garnishment, which the employer is entitled to deduct.


Step 7 – Withhold Kansas State Payroll Taxes:

As we have calculated Federal Payroll taxes, now it's time to calculate Kansas State Payroll Taxes. The State requires the employer to pay some taxes himself and rest to withhold from the employee's paycheck. Following are the State payroll taxes that usually most of the employers and employees pay:


Kansas State Income Tax

The state requires the employer to withhold the Kansas State income tax from the employee's paycheck, according to the details provided by the employee on Form K-4, which contain all the necessary details of the employee such as filing status, a number of allowances to claim, etc. This form is filled by the employee at the starting of the job. The employee must ensure that the form is updated regularly when any significant event occurs like marriage, divorce or child's birth.

The State income tax is divided into 3 tax brackets, ranging from 2.9% to 5.2%, depending on income level and filing status. Moreover, the state charges a flat rate of 5.0% for the Income-tax rate on Supplemental Wages and bonuses.

Single Filers
Alabama Taxable Income Rate
$0 - $15,000 3.10%
$15,000 - $30,000 5.25%
$30,000+ 5.70%

Married, Filing Jointly
Alabama Taxable Income Rate
$0 - $30,000 3.10%
$30,000 - $60,000 5.25%
$60,000+ 5.70%

Married, Filing Separately
Alabama Taxable Income Rate
$0 - $15,000 3.10%
$15,000 - $30,000 5.25%
$30,000+ 5.70%

Head of Household
Alabama Taxable Income Rate
$0 - $15,000 3.10%
$15,000 - $30,000 5.25%
$30,000+ 5.70%


Note: Employees are suggested to study and deduce the optimal number of Allowances to claim from Indiana State tax, as these allowances can significantly affect your take-home pay. Remember choosing more than requires a number of allowances may lead to underpayment of taxes that may lead to a penalty. On the other hand, choosing less than the required number of allowances will cause your paycheck amount to reduce, as you will be lending tax-free money to the state for a whole year.


State Unemployment Insurance (SUI) Tax:

Besides, State income tax, Kansas State also entitles the employers to pay State Unemployment Insurance (SUI) Tax at the rate range from 0.20% to 7.60% on the first $14,000 earned by each of their employees. However, New Employers are given relief to pay on a flat rate of 2.7% for wages earned by each employee.

Step 8 – Withhold Local Tax:

No city or county in Kansas charges any local income tax. However, income from other sources like dividends, securities transactions, and interest may be charged with local income tax, depending on which city you live in.


Step 9 – Calculate Pay Check:

Once you are done with all elements (steps) discussed earlier, you will have a net pay amount for each employee. Now all you have to do is pay employees on time. Also, to file all Federal Taxes, State Taxes, FICA, and FUTA taxes on time, to avoid any penalties.


Kansas State and Federal Payroll Laws:

  • The State Minimum Wage rate for Kansas is $7.25, which is the same as the Federal Minimum Wage Rate for most of the employees. However, the following employees are exempted from this law:
    • Tipped Employees: They are allowed to be paid with a minimum wage rate of $2.13 if they earn more than $20 in Tips. However, employers are required to pay the difference if the Tipped earned combined with cash minimum wage is less than the regular minimum wage rate of $7.25.
    • Interns and Student Workers: They are allowed to be paid at 85% of the regular minimum wage rate.
    • Minor Employees: Employees of age under 20 are allowed to be paid a Minimum Wage rate of $4.25 per hour for the first ninety days of employment.
    • Federal Contractors: Minimum Wage rate for federal contractors is $10.60 (from January 2019).
    • Employees exempted under FLSA law for federal Minimum Wage are also exempted under Kansas State Minimum Wage law.
  • Federal Overtime Law requires the employers to pay overtime at one and a half times regular hourly rate for every excess hour worked after 40 hours in a workweek (unless otherwise exempt).
  • Kansas State requires the employers to pay overtime at one and a half times a regular hourly rate for every excess hour worked after 46 hours in a workweek (unless otherwise exempt). However, due to the difference between federal and state overtime law, employers are required to follow the law that is more beneficial to the employees. But first, they are suggested to contact Federal Wage and Hour at (913) 551-5721 to inquire if federal laws apply to your business.
  • Meals and Lunch breaks to the employees are not required by either federal or state law. However, if the employer is willing to provide it for 20 minutes then it must be PAID, and if it is for 30 minutes or more than can be unpaid.
  • Kansas State doesn't require the employer to provide fringe benefits like vacations, sick leaves or holiday pay unless the employers are willing to provide to boost the morale of their employees.
  • The Kansas State requires the employer to pay on regularly scheduled paydays with at least a pay frequency of one month.
Also Check: Kansas Sales and Reverse Sales tax Calculator to Calculate the amount of tax included in a gross price as well as the amount you should add to a net price.

FAQs

Answer: Following taxes are deducted from the residents and nonresident employees working in Kansas:

  • Federal Income Tax: This tax is charged at the rates ranging from 0% to 37%, having seven tax brackets, depending on your income level and filing status.
  • State Income Tax: The State charges income tax at the rate ranging from 2.9% to 5.2%, having 3 tax brackets, depending on your filing status and income level.
  • FICA Taxes: Along with Federal Income Tax, federal also charges FICA taxes on a payroll that comprises of Social Security tax (6.2% paid by employee) and Medicare (1.45% paid by employee). You may also be charged an additional Medicare tax of 0.9% of your earnings exceed a certain threshold.

Answer: Kansas charges a progressive income tax with 3 tax brackets depending on the filing status and income level. Following are the tax brackets and tax rates:

For "Single" and "Married, filing separately":

  • 10% on the first $15,000 of taxable income.
  • 25% on taxable income between $15,000 and $30,000.
  • 70% on taxable income on $30,000 and above.

For "Married, Filing Jointly" and "Head of Household":

  • 10% on the first $30,000 of taxable income.
  • 25% on taxable income between $30,000 and $60,000.
  • 70% on taxable income on $60,000 and above.

Answer: Kansas State has 3 tax brackets, ranging from 2.9 to 5.2%, depending on income level and filing status.

Answer: a standard deduction for Kansas Income Tax for single filers is $3,000 for and for joint filers is $7,500. Moreover, for married persons filing separately, it is $3,750 and $5,500 for heads of household.

Answer: The Minimum Wage rate for most of the employees (unless otherwise exempt) in Kansas is $7.25, which is the same as the federal minimum wage. And for tipped employees, it is $2.13, with the maximum tip credit of $5.12.

Answer: The Livable Wage for Kansas Resident (as in 2019) for Single Adult is $10.96 and for a Couple (1 working) with 2 children is $24.47.

Answer: The minimum Wage rate in Topeka, Kansas matches with the State and Federal Minimum Wage rate of $7.25 for non-exempted employees.

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